Senior School News Articles

STUDY SKILLS: Helping Out a Stressed Child

Many parents feel powerless to help when their child is stressed and overwhelmed about their schoolwork. It is not just senior students who experience this level of stress, research indicates that for some students this starts as early as Year 7.

 

If your child is experiencing stress and anxiety related to their schoolwork, here are some strategies you can try.

 

  1. FIND OUT MORE: Try and discover what it is that is causing the most anxiety. Does your student feel anxious about tests or assignments? Are they struggling to plan and manage their workload? Are they finding a particular subject difficult? It is very difficult to address the issue until you really uncover what the issue is. If they do not want to discuss with mum and dad, you may find asking a teacher who they like and respect to talk to them may lead to a better outcome.

     

  2. LET THE SCHOOL KNOW: Next talk to your child’s tutor or a teacher that is responsible for your child’s year group. You can either ask the school to investigate further and even take action to address the issue, or you can ask them to keep it confidential as you are just wanting to make them aware of the issue.

     

  3. DECIDE STRATEGIES: Once the problem is clear, next step is to decide what strategies to try (and you may need to try multiple strategies over time). You may have some ideas of things your child could try, you may find some ideas on the Study Skills Handbook site, or you may need to talk to teachers to learn from their expertise.

     

  4. DON’T GIVE UP: If a strategy doesn’t work, then try something different.       Different people will have different suggestions so google or talk to lots of teachers or other parents about the issue and see if they have other ideas you could try.

     

  5. CONSIDER EXTRA SUPPORT: Your child may need additional support. For example from a school counsellor, or a psychologist or a tutor. Make sure you are clear about the issue so you can find the right person to provide the additional support your child needs.

 

You can learn more about strategies to help students cope with the academic demands of school at http://moodle.pcs.nsw.edu.au/. Once logged in, go to ‘Links’ on the left and select ‘Study Skills Handbook’.

A new day for students

A report by Year 6 student, Erica Loizou

 

At PCS, we have introduced this day called Superhero Day. Superhero Day is a day that kids can dress up as a Superhero that you like or admire. It is actually Friday 26 May 2017, but due to other school commitments, we held it on Monday 29 May. It was originally called Super Boss Day, but schools call it Superhero Day.

 

Most kids with a heart condition will end up having major heart surgery sometime in their life, so we are representing, that those kids are superheros for what they have been through. It is also trying to encourage students to focus about helping others, doing missions and going beyond.

 

At PCS, we do have some heart kids and families that know someone with a heart condition.

 

Heart kids Australia is the only charity for heart diseases. If you want to learn more about heart kids go to www.heartkids.org.au or call 1800 432 785.

 

TICKETS ON SALE! An Evening of Cabaret - Lots of Love PCS

PCS LotsOfLove Aug17 WebImageUPDATE!

 

EARLY BIRD TICKETS on sale until 31 July - save $5 per ticket!

 

Tickets are now ON SALE for our very special event: 'An Evening of Cabaret - Lots of Love PCS'.

 

The event will showcase the very best talent amongst our students from Year 2 to Year 12. Items range from short drama pieces to vocal items, encompassing the theme of  'Love'.

 

WHEN: 23 & 24 Aug 2017

TIME: 7pm

WHERE: The Joan

 

CLICK HERE to purchase your tickets

Middle & Senior Half-Yearly Reports

As we come to the end of term, teachers are busily finalising assessment marks and completing reports ready to be distributed on the last day of term. We are very appreciative of the extra efforts teachers go to at Exam and Reporting time.

 

When you receive your Middle and Senior School student’s Half Yearly Reports this year, you will notice a number of changes to the page layout. Over the semester, we have been looking carefully at our reporting processes and report layouts to improve this formal communication about student learning.

 

At our last Registration Review, BOSTES (now NESA) complimented our reporting practices in Junior School, mentioning this as a particular strength within the school. We have, therefore, been considering how we can build on this strength with our reporting in Middle and Senior School years.

 

In Years 5-11, the report layout has been simplified so that we can strengthen the representation of the summary of student Achievement in Assessments and Learning Engagement. As always, information about how to read the reports will accompany them.

 

We plan to continue the development of the Report Layout, and the information that is communicated on the reports, over the coming year. As we seek to make these improvements, we welcome your insight and feedback as the recipients of your student’s report.

 

We will provide an opportunity for your comments and suggestions by sending an email with a link to an online Report Feedback Survey. This will be sent to you after the Half Yearly Reports are sent home with students.

 

 

Your feedback is welcome and appreciated.

 

Corrine Robinson

Assistant Principal – Teaching and Learning

Clothing Drive

Is your closet is bursting at the seams because you have too many clothes you don't wear? Then this is a great opportunity for you!

 

Donate your old, warm clothes to the homeless. Bring your pre-loved (in good condition), adult-sized jumpers and coats to Student Reception for the Homeless Interest Group.

 

This term, in the Homeless Interest Group, we have been making 'winter survival packs' for the homeless to make coffee and tea to stay warm during the very cold Aussie winters. These will be included with clothing donations that we give to local organisations working with the homeless and disadvantaged in our community.

 

Ms Anne Cudd